This is a place for stories of your travel, suggestions for places to go in Scotland, or pictures of Art or Paintings you saw on your trip. This blog is for you if you have Celtic roots or interests, are a History buff or just like Scotland!

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18th January 2011

Photo with 8 notes

Oban (An t-Òban in Scottish Gaelic meaning The Little Bay) is a resort town within the Argyll and Bute council area of Scotland. It has a total resident population of 8,120.[1] Despite its small size, it is the largest town between Helensburgh and Fort William and during the tourist season the town can be crowded by up to 25,000  people. Oban occupies a beautiful setting in the Firth of Lorn. Oban Bay  is a near perfect horseshoe bay, protected by the island of Kerrera, and beyond Kerrera is Mull. To the north is the long low island of Lismore, and the mountains of Morvern and Ardgour.
In Oban “The Gateway to the Isles” some 9.4% of the population speak Gaelic.[2]
Attractions in Oban include the Waterfront Centre, the Cathedral of St Columba, the Oban Distillery, Dunollie Castle, Dunstaffnage Castle and McCaig’s Tower, which dominates the town’s skyline. Oban is an excellent base from which to explore the sights of Kilmartin Glen.

Oban (An t-Òban in Scottish Gaelic meaning The Little Bay) is a resort town within the Argyll and Bute council area of Scotland. It has a total resident population of 8,120.[1] Despite its small size, it is the largest town between Helensburgh and Fort William and during the tourist season the town can be crowded by up to 25,000 people. Oban occupies a beautiful setting in the Firth of Lorn. Oban Bay is a near perfect horseshoe bay, protected by the island of Kerrera, and beyond Kerrera is Mull. To the north is the long low island of Lismore, and the mountains of Morvern and Ardgour.

In Oban “The Gateway to the Isles” some 9.4% of the population speak Gaelic.[2]

Attractions in Oban include the Waterfront Centre, the Cathedral of St Columba, the Oban Distillery, Dunollie Castle, Dunstaffnage Castle and McCaig’s Tower, which dominates the town’s skyline. Oban is an excellent base from which to explore the sights of Kilmartin Glen.

Tagged: ObanScotlandWestern HighlandsScottish Vacation

4th December 2010

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Why the wintry conditions?
An area of high pressure is  sitting to the west of the UK, preventing warm, moist air from the  Atlantic reaching the UK, and instead drawing in cold air from  Scandinavia.  It has been the heaviest and most widespread November snow since 1993, and the deepest November snow since 1965. 
As this air has moved across the North Sea, it has picked up moisture  from the relatively warm water and formed snow showers. As a result,  eastern areas have seen the heaviest snow.

Why the wintry conditions?

An area of high pressure is sitting to the west of the UK, preventing warm, moist air from the Atlantic reaching the UK, and instead drawing in cold air from Scandinavia.  It has been the heaviest and most widespread November snow since 1993, and the deepest November snow since 1965.

As this air has moved across the North Sea, it has picked up moisture from the relatively warm water and formed snow showers. As a result, eastern areas have seen the heaviest snow.

Tagged: Snow UKweather UK

15th June 2010

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Castle History Cardiff Castle is one of Wales’ leading heritage attractions and a site of                               international significance. During 2000 years of history, the Castle has been a Roman                               Garrison, a Norman stronghold and in Victorian times was transformed into a gothic                               fairytale fantasy.

Castle History

Cardiff Castle is one of Wales’ leading heritage attractions and a site of international significance. During 2000 years of history, the Castle has been a Roman Garrison, a Norman stronghold and in Victorian times was transformed into a gothic fairytale fantasy.

11th June 2010

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The main attraction is the mystical beauty of the island. Considered part of the Inner Hebrides, Skye is arguably the most scenically spectacular of all the Western British Islands. Castle ruins, waterfalls plunging into ocean, mist-covered, green craggy cliffs - it seems that every turn in the road might turn up a new scene of wonder. Visitors usually have the opportunity to experience these sights in both fine weather and romantic stormy weather, as many days on Skye seem to undergo all four seasons. Storms also provide a perfect excuse to sample a “wee dram” at the local pub.
The Faerie Glen, or the Faeries’ Meeting Place, is located at the north end of the island near Uig. The surreal tranquility of this glen is enough to make even the most cynical consider the existence of the little people. The actual area of the meeting place is small, but its overall effect complete with looming branches, circle formation, grassy knolls and its tiny bluff - is impressive.

The main attraction is the mystical beauty of the island. Considered part of the Inner Hebrides, Skye is arguably the most scenically spectacular of all the Western British Islands. Castle ruins, waterfalls plunging into ocean, mist-covered, green craggy cliffs - it seems that every turn in the road might turn up a new scene of wonder. Visitors usually have the opportunity to experience these sights in both fine weather and romantic stormy weather, as many days on Skye seem to undergo all four seasons. Storms also provide a perfect excuse to sample a “wee dram” at the local pub.

The Faerie Glen, or the Faeries’ Meeting Place, is located at the north end of the island near Uig. The surreal tranquility of this glen is enough to make even the most cynical consider the existence of the little people. The actual area of the meeting place is small, but its overall effect complete with looming branches, circle formation, grassy knolls and its tiny bluff - is impressive.

Tagged: FairiesSkyeBeautyScotland

5th June 2010

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When the US Interior Secretary Ken Salazar promised to keep “the boot on the neck of British Petroleum” over its giant Gulf of Mexico oil spill, the Republican Rand Paul rounded on the White House for being “really un-American” in attacking business.  If so, almost everyone is guilty of un-American activities, as the US has declared open season on the British oil giant. Just 50 yards up the street from The Daily Telegraph’s Manhattan office, the local BP petrol station had its sign daubed in paint the colour of drilling mud last week when 200 protesters turned up. “BP – a bunch of ——ing murderers!” said the message on a protester’s T-shirt. The chant was better: “BP, your heart is black, you can have your oil back.”

When the US Interior Secretary Ken Salazar promised to keep “the boot on the neck of British Petroleum” over its giant Gulf of Mexico oil spill, the Republican Rand Paul rounded on the White House for being “really un-American” in attacking business. If so, almost everyone is guilty of un-American activities, as the US has declared open season on the British oil giant. Just 50 yards up the street from The Daily Telegraph’s Manhattan office, the local BP petrol station had its sign daubed in paint the colour of drilling mud last week when 200 protesters turned up. “BP – a bunch of ——ing murderers!” said the message on a protester’s T-shirt. The chant was better: “BP, your heart is black, you can have your oil back.”

1st June 2010

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Avebury is the site of a large henge and  several stone circles surrounding the village of Avebury in the English county of Wiltshire.  It is one of the finest and largest Neolithic monuments in Europe, about 5,000 years old. Although older than the megalithic stages of Stonehenge 32 kilometres (20 mi) to the south,  the two monuments are broadly contemporary overall. Avebury is roughly  midway between the towns of Marlborough and Calne,  just off the main A4 road on the  northbound A4361 towards Wroughton.  Avebury is a Scheduled Ancient  Monument,[1] a World Heritage Site,[2] and a National Trust property.[3]

Avebury is the site of a large henge and several stone circles surrounding the village of Avebury in the English county of Wiltshire. It is one of the finest and largest Neolithic monuments in Europe, about 5,000 years old. Although older than the megalithic stages of Stonehenge 32 kilometres (20 mi) to the south, the two monuments are broadly contemporary overall. Avebury is roughly midway between the towns of Marlborough and Calne, just off the main A4 road on the northbound A4361 towards Wroughton. Avebury is a Scheduled Ancient Monument,[1] a World Heritage Site,[2] and a National Trust property.[3]

28th May 2010

Photo with 4 notes

Stalking red or roe deer is a fascinating way to discover Scotland’s landscape and culture. You will spend time walking through beautiful landscapes - mountains, glens and forests - as you go in search of the deer. You will spend time with local stalkers on the hill and often join them for a wee dram of whisky in a local pub after the stalk - so it also gives you an insight to Scottish life and culture. Finally, the tradition of deer stalking will offer you an insight of Scottish culture which many other visitors will never experience.

Stalking red or roe deer is a fascinating way to discover Scotland’s landscape and culture. You will spend time walking through beautiful landscapes - mountains, glens and forests - as you go in search of the deer. You will spend time with local stalkers on the hill and often join them for a wee dram of whisky in a local pub after the stalk - so it also gives you an insight to Scottish life and culture. Finally, the tradition of deer stalking will offer you an insight of Scottish culture which many other visitors will never experience.

Tagged: Huntingdeerstag

26th May 2010

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Hadrian was born on January 24, 76 A.D. He died on July 10, 138, having been emperor since 117. During this time he worked on reforms and consolidated the Roman provinces. For eleven years Hadrian toured his empire.

Hadrian was born on January 24, 76 A.D. He died on July 10, 138, having been emperor since 117. During this time he worked on reforms and consolidated the Roman provinces. For eleven years Hadrian toured his empire.

25th May 2010

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Skara Brae (pronounced /ˈskɑrə ˈbreɪ/) is a large stone-built Neolithic settlement, located on the Bay of Skaill on the west coast of Mainland, Orkney, Scotland. It consists of ten clustered houses, and was occupied from roughly 3180 BC–2500 BC. It is Europe’s most complete Neolithic village and the level of preservation is such that it has gained UNESCO World Heritage Site status,[1]  and been called the “Scottish Pompeii.”

Skara Brae (pronounced /ˈskɑrə ˈbreɪ/) is a large stone-built Neolithic settlement, located on the Bay of Skaill on the west coast of Mainland, Orkney, Scotland. It consists of ten clustered houses, and was occupied from roughly 3180 BC–2500 BC. It is Europe’s most complete Neolithic village and the level of preservation is such that it has gained UNESCO World Heritage Site status,[1] and been called the “Scottish Pompeii.”

24th May 2010

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Cromlech is a Brythonic word (Breton/Welsh) used to describe prehistoric megalithic  structures, where crom means “bent” and llech means “flagstone”. The term is now virtually obsolete in archæology, but remains in use as a colloquial term for two different types of megalithic  monument.

Cromlech is a Brythonic word (Breton/Welsh) used to describe prehistoric megalithic structures, where crom means “bent” and llech means “flagstone”. The term is now virtually obsolete in archæology, but remains in use as a colloquial term for two different types of megalithic monument.